Oklahoma City Bombing

 

  • Lucio Aleman Jr., 33, was a safety engineer with the Federal Highway Administration. He liked to draw, listen to jazz and spend time with his wife, son and daughter.
  • Teresa Alexander, 33, had gone to the federal building to get a Social Security number for her 9-month-old son, Shawn. She worked at the Marriott Hotel and as a nurse’s assistant at Baptist Medical Center. She is survived by her husband, Martin, a son and a daughter.
  • Ted Allen, 48, was the community development director for the Department of Housing and Urban Development. His wife, Caye, dropped him off at work just seven minutes before the blast. He is survived by his wife and five children.
  • Richard A. Allen, 46, worked as a claims representative for the Social Security Administration. He is survived by his mother and a daughter.
  • Baylee Almon, 1, was photographed by a banker as she was being carried from the bombed building by a firefighter. The photo, which appeared on the front page of newspapers across the country, won the Pulitzer Prize for spot news photography last week. The child, called “”Miss Baylee” by her family, died of her injuries. President Clinton met with Baylee’s mother and other relatives before her funeral.
  • Diane E. Althouse, 44, worked at HUD. She is survived by a son, daughter and granddaughter.
  • Rebecca Anderson, 37, a nurse, wasn’t in the federal building but rushed to the scene minutes after the explosion to help in the rescue. She suffered severe head injuries when she was hit by concrete and knocked to the ground. Her heart and kidneys were donated, and the heart recipient later died. She is survived by her husband, Fred, and four children.
  • Pamela Argo, 36, worked two jobs – as a hospital administrator and for a catering company. Friends say she spent many weekends working on her small brick house. Argo was at the federal building for an appointment in the Social Security offices when the bomb exploded.
  • Sandra Avery, 34, had worked for the Social Security Administration for nine years. She was a native of Danville, Ark., whose family moved to Oklahoma when she was a child.
  • Peter Avillanoza, 57, was fair housing and equal opportunity director for HUD. He is survived by his wife, three sons and three daughters.
  • Peola and Calvin Battle were inside the federal building to apply for disability assistance for Calvin, who recently had suffered a stroke.
  • Danielle Belle, 16 months, had attended America’s Kids day-care center since November 1994. Her mother said she was a happy child who loved dogs.
  • Oleta C. Biddy, 54, of Oklahoma City was a service representative for the Social Security Administration. She was survived by her husband, Henry, a son and two grandchildren.
  • Shelly Turner Bland, 25, of Tuttle was an asset forfeiture specialist for the Drug Enforcement Administration. She and her husband, Gary, had been married for about a year and had a daughter.
  • Andrea Y. Blanton, 33, was a secretary at HUD. She was survived by her husband, Daniel.
  • Olen Burl Bloomer, 61, an Air Force veteran, was a budget assistant for the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Utah, Texas and Oklahoma City. A native Oklahoman, Bloomer is survived by a daughter, eight brothers and sisters and five grandchildren.
  • Army Sgt. 1st Class Lola Bolden, 40, had been stationed in Oklahoma City for four months. Bolden was survived by a daughter and two sons.
  • James E. Boles, 51, was the local administrative officer for the Agriculture Department. He had a small farm, where he raised chickens and rabbits. He is survived by his wife and two sons.
  • Mark A. Bolte, 27, was transferred from the Federal Highway Administration office in Austin, Texas, to Oklahoma City in January 1995. He graduated from the University of Arkansas.
  • Cassandra K. Booker, 25, went to the building to fill out paperwork to get her 2-year-old twin boys Social Security cards. She was about to graduate from an airline reservations school. She is survived by the twins and two other children.
  • Carol Bowers, 53, was an operations supervisor for the Social Security Administration. A native Oklahoman, she is survived by her husband, Leonard, her mother and a son.
  • Peachlyn Bradley, 3, was the daughter of Dana Bradley, whose leg was amputated to free her from the rubble. The girl had gone into the building with her mother, aunt and grandmother to get a Social Security card for her brother, Gabreon Bruce. Her brother and grandmother also died.
  • Woodrow “Woody” Brady, 41, was a self-employed children’s book maker.
  • Cynthia Campbell Brown, 26, was buried in the same Texas church where she was married just six weeks earlier. She married fellow Secret Service agent Ron Brown in March, and was hoping to be transferred from Oklahoma City so she could be near him in Phoenix.
  • Paul G. Broxterman, 43, had moved to Oklahoma City two weeks before the bombing to take a job as an agent for the HUD inspector general. He had been a law enforcement officer for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Food and Drug Administration’s inspector general. He was survived by his wife and three children.
  • Gabreon Bruce, 4 months, was with his mother, sister, aunt and grandmother at the Social Security office, where his mother was trying to get him a Social Security card. His sister, Peachlyn Bradley, and grandmother, Cheryl Hammons, also died. He was survived by his mother and father.
  • Kim Burgess, 29, worked at the Federal Employees Credit Union. She had been married to Damon Burgess only six months and moved to Oklahoma City from South Carolina.
  • David N. Burkett, 47, was a financial analyst for community development at HUD.
  • Donald E. Burns, 62, was a construction analyst at HUD. Burns played golf and often held barbecues for his co-workers. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, two daughters, a son and three grandchildren.
  • Karen Gist Carr, 32, was an advertising assistant for Army recruiting and was co-recipient of the first Patrick J. King Award for best communications program in the Army Recruiting Command. She was survived by her husband, Gregory.
  • Michael J. Carrillo, 44, was a motor carrier safety inspector for the Federal Highway Administration. He was survived by three children.
  • Rona Chafey, 35, was a secretary for the Cleveland County Sheriff’s Department but was assigned to the Drug Enforcement Administration two years ago. She was survived by her husband, Raymond, a son, a daughter and her parents.
  • Zackary Chavez, 3, attended America’s Kids day-care center. His grandfather remembered giving him quarters. “When you would give him a quarter, he would always take it to his mom,” Cereaco Hernandez said.
  • Robert N. Chipman, 51, joined the Oklahoma Water Resources Board six months before the bombing. Chipman previously was an associate professor of economics at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. He is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.
  • Kimberly Kay Clark, 39, worked as a legal assistant at HUD and was a petty officer first class on active status in the Naval Reserve. She loved long-distance biking and was survived by her fiance, parents and two brothers.
  • Dr. Margaret “Peggy” Clark, 42, was veterinary medical officer for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She didn’t work out of the federal building but was there to meet people. She was survived by her husband and three daughters.
  • Antonio Ansara Cooper Jr., 6 months, was enrolled in the day care center.
  • Christopher Cooper, 2, had recently recovered from the chicken pox and had attended the America’s Kids center only briefly.
  • Dana L. Cooper, 24, was Christopher’s mother. She was director of the day-care center so she could keep a close eye on him. She was planning to fly to San Francisco on the day of the bombing for a day-care conference. Both Cooper, 24, and her son died. She was survived by her husband and Christopher’s father, A.C. Cooper.
  • Harley Cottingham Jr., 46, was an agent with the Defense Investigative Service. A native of Murray, Neb., he was known as a nature lover who planted and sold Christmas trees. He was survived by his parents, two sisters and brother.
  • Kim R. Cousins, 33, of Midwest City was a construction coordinator for HUD. She was a member of South Lindsay Baptist Church, where she taught second-grade Sunday school. She also was active in the parent-teacher association. She was survived by her husband, Lyle, and a son.
  • Elijah Coverdale, 2, and his brother, Aaron, 5, attended the day-care center for two years. The boys lived with their grandmother, Jannie Coverdale. Both boys died.
  • Jaci R. Coyne, 14 months, was survived by her parents, Scott and Sharon, and grandparents.
  • Katherine L. Cregan, 60, worked for the Social Security Administration. She was survived by three sons and five grandchildren.
  • Richard Cummins, 56, was a senior investigator with the Department of Agriculture, which he joined in 1965. He worked with the Midwest Stolen Dog Task Force, organized to stop the theft of pets for sale to research institutions. He was survived by his wife, two daughters and son.
  • Steven Curry, 44, of Norman, was an inspector for the General Services Administration. He was survived by his wife, Kathleen, a son and a daughter.
  • Brenda Daniels, 42, was a child-care teacher who had lived in Oklahoma City for 13 years. She was survived by three daughters, three stepdaughters and her parents.
  • Sgt. Benjamin Davis, 29, was a Marine Corps recruiter. He was an Oklahoma City native, survived by his wife and daughter.
  • Diana Lynn Day, 38, was a program assistant with HUD. She was survived by a brother and a son.
  • Peter DeMaster, 44, was a civilian employee for the Defense Department. He was survived by his wife, Kaye.
  • Castine Deveroux, 48, worked at HUD.
  • Sheila Driver, 28, was a student at Langston University. She was survived by her husband, Gregory.
  • Tylor Eaves, 8 months, had been going to America’s Kids day-care center for just a week. His mother, Miya Eaves, worked a few blocks away at Standard Life. He also was survived by his grandmother, Gloria Eaves Hardin.
  • Ashley Eckles, 4, was at the federal building with her grandparents, Luther, 61, and LaRue, 56, Treanor. Luther was at the Social Security office to get paperwork in order for his retirement. All three died.
  • Susan J. Ferrell, 37, was an attorney with HUD, where she had worked for 10 years. She was survived by her parents, a sister and brother-in-law.
  • Carrol “Chip” Fields, 49, worked as an office assistant for the Drug Enforcement Administration. She was survived by her husband, Ron, and a son.
  • Katherine Ann Finley, 44, of Oklahoma City had been with the Federal Employees Credit Union for 21 years, including the past 10 as vice president. She was survived by her husband, Riley, and a daughter.
  • Judy J. Fisher, 45, worked for HUD. She also was a Sunday school teacher. She is survived by her husband, two sons and a daughter.
  • Linda L. Florence, 43, was a secretary at HUD. She is survived by her husband, David, a son and her mother.
  • Donald and Mary Anne Fritzler went to the federal building on business one day after celebrating their 35th wedding anniversary. Donald, 64, had his own architectural firm, Fritzler and Associates Inc., where his 57-year-old wife worked. Both died.
  • Tevin Garrett, 1, enjoyed riding his yellow bike and sliding down his slide. He was survived by his mother, stepfather and a sister.
  • Laura Jane Garrison, 62, of Oklahoma City, was at the Social Security office to fill out retirement papers. An admissions clerk at Oklahoma Memorial Hospital, she planned to retire in July. She ws survived by three children.
  • Jamie Genzer, 32, worked at the Federal Employees Credit Union.
  • Margaret Goodson, 55, worked for the Social Security Administration. She was survived by her husband, two sons and one daughter.
  • Kevin Lee Gottshall, 6 months, of Norman. He was enrolled at the day-care center.
  • Ethel Griffin, 55, was an avid craftswoman and worked as a service representative for the Social Security Administration. She was survived by her husband, Bruce, two sons and three grandchildren.
  • Colleen Guiles, 58, worked at HUD. Her son also worked in the federal building but left before the explosion.
  • Randolph Guzman, 28, was a Marine whose body was found behind his recruiting desk. Guzman was from Castro Valley, Calif., and was executive officer of the Oklahoma City recruiting station.
  • Cheryl Hammons, 44, was a nursing technician and the grandmother of Gabreon Bruce and Peachlyn Bradley. She was survived by her mother and two daughters.
  • Ronald Harding, 55, of Oklahoma City was a claims representative for the Social Security Administration.
  • Thomas L. Hawthorne, 52, worked for Dayton Tire and belonged to the Harrah United Methodist Church. He was survived by his wife, Donna, two sons and a daughter.
  • Doris Higginbottom, 44, was a purchasing agent for the Agriculture Department’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. She was survived by her husband, two children and her mother.
  • Anita Hightower, 27, left Fort Worth, Texas, in 1991 to take care of a sick aunt in Oklahoma City. She was a secretary for the Job Corps in an office across the street from the federal building. She was survived by two daughters and her mother.
  • Thompson E. “”Gene” Hodges, 54, was a supervisor at HUD.
  • Peggy Louis Holland, 37, was a computer specialist for the Army Recruiting Battalion in Oklahoma City, as well as a Sunday school teacher and a children’s choir leader.
  • Linda Coleen Housley, 53, was a loan officer with the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her husband, two daughters, son and two stepdaughters.
  • George Michael Howard, 46, had transferred to the Oklahoma City office of HUD earlier this month from Vallejo, Calif., to be closer to his recently widowed father. He was a community development representative for HUD’s Native American programs.
  • Wanda Howell, 34, was a child-care teacher. Survivors included her husband and two daughters.
  • Robbin Huff, 37, was expecting her first child in June. She was a loan officer in the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her husband, Ron, three sisters and a brother.
  • Charles Hurlburt, 73, and wife Anna Jean, 67, of Oklahoma City both were killed in the Social Security office.
  • Paul D. Ice, 42, was a U.S. Customs agent and one of the first special agents assigned to the Oklahoma City office when it opened in 1988. He was survived by two daughters and his parents.
  • Christi Y. Jenkins, 32, was a teller at the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her husband, Aldo, and her parents.
  • Norma Jean Johnson, 62, was executive secretary for the Defense Investigative Service. She was survived by her husband, son and three daughters.
  • Raymond Lee Johnson, 59, worked for the National Indian Council on Aging in the Social Security office.
  • Larry Jones, 46, was a Vietnam veteran who retired after 20 years in the Air Force. He had worked the past two years as a computer program specialist for the Federal Highway Department. He coached youth soccer and football teams. He was survived by his parents, his wife Karen, two sons and one daughter.
  • Alvin Justes, 54, was a Vietnam veteran who was visiting the credit union.
  • Blake Ryan Kennedy, 18 months, attended the day-care center at the federal building.
  • Carole Khalil, 50, of Oklahoma City worked for the Department of Agriculture. Valerie Jo Koelsch, 33, had been marketing director for the Federal Employees Credit Union for 11 years. She was an active member of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church.
  • Carolyn A. Kreymborg, 57, was an automation clerk at HUD. Her 33-year-old daughter, Michelle Ann Reeder, who worked for the federal highway department, also was killed. Mrs. Kreymborg was survived by her husband, James, and a son.
  • Teresa Lea Lauderdale, 41, had worked in the Oklahoma City HUD office for 13 years.
  • Catherine Leinen, 47, had been a collections officer with the Federal Employees Credit Union for 13 years. She loved to camp, travel and work on crafts. She was survived by her husband, Henry Carlile, two children, three step children and a grandchild.
  • Carrie Lenz, 26, who was pregnant with a boy, worked for DynCorp, but was contracted to the Drug Enforcement Administration. She also was a graduate student at Rose State University. Lenz was survived by her husband, Mike, and her parents.
  • Donald R. Leonard, 50, was an Army veteran who had worked for the Secret Service since 1970. He was survived by his wife, Diane, and three sons.
  • Airman 1st Class Lakesha R. Levy, 21, was a New Orleans native who had moved to Midwest City in January for nine months of training at Tinker Air Force Base. Levy drove to the building the morning of the bombing to get a new Social Security card. She was survived by her husband, Corey, and 2-year-old son Corey II.
  • Dominique London, nearly 3, loved to play outside. He was survived by his mother, Tonya London, two brothers and a sister.
  • Rheta Ione Bender Long, 60, began her career with the federal government in 1974 as an Army personnel clerk. She worked for the Fish and Wildlife Service and had been with the Agriculture Department’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in Oklahoma City since 1982. She is survived by a son and a daughter.
  • Michael Loudenslager, 48, was a planner-estimator for the General Services Administration. He was survived by his wife, Betty, and one son.
  • Robert Luster, 45, disabled by a heart attack three years ago, and his 43-year-old wife, Aurelia “Donna” Luster, were filling out paperwork at the federal building. While the couple was still listed as missing, their landlord threatened to evict them and their six children. Donations poured in from around the country and the family left the rundown house before eviction proceedings could get under way.
  • Mickey Maroney, 50, a Secret Service agent, had worked for the government 24 years. Born in Wichita Falls, Texas, he played for the Razorbacks when the University of Arkansas won the national football championship in 1964.
  • James K. Martin, 34, had moved to Oklahoma City in February to take a job as a highway engineer with the Federal Highway Administration. He was survived by his parents and a sister.
  • Gilberto Martinez, 35, was a minister at El Tabernacle De Fe who often took Spanish-speaking members of his church to the federal building to help them fill out forms. Martinez was helping Emilio Tapia, another victim, get a Social Security card the day of the bombing. Martinez was survived by his wife and five children.
  • Tresia Mathes-Worton, 28, was a teller at the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her parents.
  • James McCarthy, 53, was transferred to the HUD office in Oklahoma City four months before the blast. He previously worked in the Kansas City, Mo., office. He was survived by his wife and three children.
  • Kenneth McCullough, 36, was an Army veteran who had worked for the Drug Enforcement Administration for five years. He was survived by his wife, Sharon, a daughter and a son.
  • Betsy Janice McGonnell, 47, was an asset loan manager at HUD. She belonged to St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Norman. She was survived by her mother, stepfather, son and daughter.
  • Linda G. McKinney, 48, was office manager for the Secret Service. She was survived by her husband, son and stepdaughter.
  • Cartney Koch McRaven, 19, had been married just four days and was at the Social Security office changing her name. She was an airman first class at Tinker Air Force Base, and was survived by her husband, a senior airman.
  • Claude Medearis, 41, was senior special agent at the U.S. Customs Service office. Before that, he was a probation and parole officer for the state of Oklahoma. He was survived by his wife, daughter, son and mother.
  • Claudette Meek, 44, of Oklahoma City, worked at the Federal Employees Credit Union.
  • Frankie Merrell, 23, was a teller at the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her husband, Charles, and a daughter.
  • Derwin Miller, 27, worked in the Social Security office.
  • Eula Leigh Mitchell, 64, had accompanied her husband, Joe, to the Social Security office to fill out forms for his retirement benefits. She was a Sunday school teacher. Her husband was hurt but survived.
  • John C. Moss, 51, was a civilian employee in the Army recruiting office. The Arkansas native was survived by his parents.
  • Pat Nix, 47, of Edmond was a financial adviser for HUD and had worked for the government for 25 years. She and her husband, Steve, had two children.
  • Jerry Lee Parker, 45, was a civil engineer for the Federal Highway Administration. He taught Sunday school and sat on the board of the Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist Church in Norman. He was survived by his wife, one son and two daughters.
  • Jill Randolph, 27, worked for the Federal Employees Credit Union as a certified public accountant. Survivors included her parents and a sister.
  • Michelle Ann Reeder, 33, had worked as an administrative assistant for the Federal Highway Administration for about eight months. Her 57-year-old mother, Carolyn A. Kreymborg, worked in the HUD office and also was killed. Mrs. Reeder was survived by her husband, Patrick, a Marine staff sergeant.
  • Terry S. Rees, 41, worked for the Department of Housing and Urban Development for 18 years. She collected teddy bears and spent some of her free time attending teddy bear and crafts shows. She is survived by her husband, Bob Chumard, two stepsons, and her mother and stepfather.
  • Mary L. Rentie, 39, of Bethany had worked for the Department of Housing and Urban Development for six years. She and her husband, Ben, had two daughters.
  • Antonio Reyes, 55, worked for the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Survivors include his wife, daughter and 30-year-old son, Michael, who also worked for HUD and survived a four-story fall.
  • Kathryn Ridley, 24, was a student with the Guthrie Job Corps. She had two daughters, ages 4 and 4 months.
  • Trudy Rigney, 31, was a senior geography student at the University of Oklahoma. She had an internship with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. She was survived by an 11-year-old son.
  • Claudine Ritter, 48, of Moore, was a collection officer for the Federal Employees Credit Union.
  • Christi Rosas, 22, had been a receptionist in the loan department of the Federal Employees Credit Union for just eight days. She was married, with a 4-month old son.
  • Sonja Sanders, 27, of Moore, worked for six years at the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her husband, Mike, and two young daughters.
  • Lanny Scroggins, 46, a Department of Housing and Urban Development employee, had worked for the government for 23 years and was a decorated Vietnam veteran. Scroggins was survived by his wife, Cheryl, two sons and his father.
  • Kathy L. Seidl, 39, had recently marked her 10-year anniversary as an investigative assistant with the Secret Service. She was survived by her husband, Glenn, a son and a stepson.
  • Leora Lee Sells, 57, of Oklahoma City, was a legal secretary for the Department of Housing and Urban Development. She taught Sunday school, sang in the choir and was a youth counselor at her church. Survivors included her husband, Roy.
  • Karan Shepherd, 27, of Moore, was a loan officer with the Federal Employees Credit Union. She was survived by her husband and two daughters.
  • Colton and Chase Smith, 2 and 3 years old, wanted to be together all the time, according to their mother, Edye Smith. The boys died together, shortly after their mother dropped them off at the day care center.
  • Army Sgt. 1st Class Victoria Sohn, 36, spent 16 years in the military and was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal and 10 other honors. She also was active in the parent-teacher association and was an assistant leader of a Brownie troop. Survivors included her husband and five children.
  • John Stewart, 51, worked at the Department of Housing and Urban Development and spent his spare time woodworking and working with horses. He was survived by his wife, Jean, two daughters and one son.
  • Dolores M. Stratton, 51, was a military personnel clerk. She was survived by her husband, Charles, two children and three grandchildren.
  • Emilio Tapia, 49, was a landscaper from Oklahoma City and a widower.
  • Victoria J. Texter, 37, had worked at the Federal Employees Credit Union for 14 years. She enjoyed making porcelain dolls and growing flowers. She was survived by her husband, Jim, and a son.
  • Charlotte Thomas, 43, produced the Black Awareness program for the Social Security office and had worked for the federal government for 17 years. She was survived by her husband, John, parents, two sons and a daughter.
  • Michael Thompson, 47, worked in the Social Security office. He was survived by his wife, Joanne, three sons and two daughters.
  • Virginia Thompson, 56, had been hired as a receptionist in the loan department of the Federal Employees Credit Union in January 1995. She enjoyed working in her garden and was survived by two sons and a daughter.
  • Kayla M. Titsworth, 3, went to the federal building with her father the morning of the explosion. Bill Titsworth was injured. The family had recently moved to Oklahoma City from Fort Riley, Kan.
  • Ricky L. Tomlin, 46, was a special agent with the Department of Transportation. He and his wife, Tina, celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on Valentine’s Day 1995. The couple had two sons. In his spare time, he enjoyed restoring old Plymouths.
  • Luther and LaRue Treanor went to the federal building with their granddaughter, 4-year-old Ashley Eckles. Her body was found days before those of her grandparents. He was 61; she was 56.
  • Larry L. Turner, 43, was a special agent with the Defense Investigative Service.
  • Jules Valdez, 51, worked in the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Indian Affairs Division. He was survived by his wife and a daughter.
  • John K. VanEss, 67, was due to retire from his longtime Department of Housing and Urban Development job at the end of 1995. He was survived by his wife, four children and four grandchildren.
  • Johnny A. Wade, 42, was a civil engineer for the federal highway department. He was survived by his wife, a son and daughter, and his mother.
  • David J. Walker, 54, was an environmental specialist with the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He was an active member of the First Baptist Church, serving on its building committee. He was survived by his wife, Janet, three daughters and two grandsons.
  • Robert Nolan Walker Jr., 52, and his wife, Judy, both worked at the Social Security office. Mrs. Walker, who recently had been promoted, was in Dallas for job training the day of the explosion. Walker had gone to work as usual. He had a heart attack in the summer of 1994, and was considering retirement.
  • Wanda L. Watkins, 49, was a civilian recruiting clerk for the Army. She spent much of her time crocheting doilies and working in her flower garden. She was survived by her parents and a sister.
  • Michael Weaver, 45, was general counsel for the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He was survived by his wife of 21 years and his two sons, whom he coached in baseball, basketball and soccer.
  • Julie Welch, 23, graduated last year from Marquette University in Milwaukee and worked with Spanish-speaking clients in the Social Security office. She was planning to marry an Air Force lieutenant. She is survived by her parents, a brother and a stepbrother.
  • Robert Westberry, 57, was the agent in charge of the Defense Investigative Service. Survivors include a daughter in South Carolina.
  • Alan G. Whicher, 40, had been a member of President Clinton’s Secret Service detail until seven months ago, when he became assistant special agent in charge of the Oklahoma field office. Minutes before the explosion, Whicher had called his wife of 20 years, Pam, and wished her luck on her speech that morning to a Bible group. They had three children.
  • Jo Ann Whittenberg, 35, was survived by her mother and a twin sister.
  • Frances A. Williams, 48, was a Department of Housing and Urban Development secretary for eight years. Survivors included her mother, son and daughter.
  • Scott Williams, 24, was delivering food to the day care center when the bomb went off. His wife, Nicole, was eight months pregnant with a daughter.
  • William Stephen Williams, 42, was an operations supervisor in the Social Security office. He was survived by his wife and three daughters.
  • Clarence Eugene Wilson, 49, was chief legal counsel for the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • Sharon Louise Wood-Chesnut, 47, worked in the Social Security office. She had a daughter and two stepchildren.
  • Ronota A. Woodbridge, 31, worked for the federal highway department. She is survived by her parents.
  • John A. Youngblood, 52, worked as a motor carrier safety inspector for the U.S. Department of Transportation. He died on May 12, more than three weeks after the bombing, of lung complications caused by smoke inhalation.

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